stumblin’

I haven’t had a good stumble in a long time. Let’s inject some pseudo-randomness into my brain.

Ten mysteries that hint at forgotten advanced civilizations (Listverse.com): I like the theory that advanced civilizations have come and gone in the past, only to be forgotten by history. I mean, picture some advanced civilization at a local level. Some people decided to park in Eden, figured out farming, had enough leisure time to chill and invent things, and came up with some really cool technology. Then something went wrong. An earthquake or a volcano. 99% of the people died.

If 99% of our current global population died, would we be able to pull it back together and be back to making iPhones any time soon? I don’t think so. At first, you’d be so worried about survival, wasting precious time to collect and properly store knowledge. Generations, probably, just scrabbling to survive. Before you know it, everything that our civilization was is rotting away and no one remembers how to make anything. We’d be back in the Stone Age.

I’m not saying they had spaceships or computers. I think it takes a global civilization to be able to pull that kind of thing off. But they might have been using electricity. All you need for that is some copper wire and a magnet. I know that’s oversimplifying it a bit, but look at how fast it happened in our civilization.

It’s fun to think about, and it’s inspired some interesting trains of thought when I sit down to write.

newspaper: "woman hits moose on way to visit sister who hit moose"
Canadian detected.

Sumerian culture and the Annunaki (xfacts.com): In case you’re not “in the know” or “crazy”, the Annunaki are an extraterrestrial race of beings who come from the tenth planet in the solar system (it hides really well or something).

I enjoy letting my brain follow the bullshit connections with these. It’s like a good fiction. A good story. True or not? Probably not. Sounds pretty implausible. But it’s enjoyable to read.

Murder or suicide?

This was in a gigantic image taken from some kind of journal (can’t be bothered to look it up) called “Duty First”, Volume 7, Number 2, Spring 2006. I’m typing it out rather than posting the image because I type quickly enough that it’s not a bother and it’s a giant, bad jpeg but an interesting story. Story follows:

At the 1994 annual awards dinner given for Forensic Science, AAFS President Dr. Don Harper Mills astounded his audience with the legal complications of a bizarre death. Here is the story.

On March 23, 1994 the medical examiner viewed the body of Ronald Opus and concluded that he died from a shotgun wound to the head. Mr. Opus had jumped from the top of a ten-story building intending to commit suicide.

He left a note to the effect indicating his despondency.

As he fell past the ninth floor his life was interrupted by a shotgun blast passing through a window, which killed him instantly. Neither the shooter nor the deceased was aware that a safety net had been installed just below the eighth floor level to protect some building workers and that Ronald Opus would not have been able to complete his suicide the way he had planned.

“Ordinarily,” Dr. Mills continued, “A person who sets out to commit suicide and ultimately succeeds, even though the mechanism might not be what he intended, is still defined as committing suicide.” That Mr. Opus was shot on the way to certain death, but probably would not have been successful because of the safety net, caused the medical examiner to feel that he had a homicide on his hands.

In the room on the ninth floor, where the shotgun blast emanated, was occupied by an elderly man and his wife. They were arguing vigorously and he was threatening her with a shotgun. The man was so upset that when he pulled the trigger he completely missed his wife and the pellets went through the window striking Mr. Opus. When one intends to kill subject “A” but kills subject “B” in the attempt, one is guilty of the murder of subject “B.”

When confronted with the murder charge the old man and his wife were both adamant and both said that they thought the shotgun was unloaded. The old man said it was a long-standing habit to threaten his wife with the unloaded shotgun. He had no intention to murder her. Therefore the killing of Mr. Opus appeared to be an accident; that is, if the gun had been accidentally loaded.

The continuing investigation turned up a witness who saw the old couple’s son loading the shotgun about six weeks prior to the fatal accident. It transpired that the old lady had cut off her son’s financial support and the son, knowing the propensity of his father to use the shotgun threateningly, loaded the gun with the expectation that his father would shoot his mother.

Since the loader of the gun was aware of this, he was guilty of the murder even though he didn’t actually pull the trigger. The case now becomes one of murder on the part of the son for the death of Ronald Opus.

Now comes the exquisite twist.

Further investigation revealed that the son was, in fact, Ronald Opus. He had become increasingly despondent over the failure of the attempt to engineer his mother’s murder. This led him to jump off the ten story building on March 23rd, only to be killed by a shotgun blast passing through the ninth story window. The son had actually murdered himself so the medical examiner closed the case as a suicide.

Somewhere, at a Starbucks in LA, a screenwriter is putting this story to script. I wonder if he needs more cocaine.

Prime Number Patterns (jasondavies.com): Math is beautiful. I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again: I wish I had more time to get deeper into mathematics.

The eyeballing game (woodgears.ca): Turns out that I’m pretty good at this. I got a 4.78 on my first try and a 4.97 on my second game (taking almost 30 seconds less). Fun little distraction.

That totally happened, guys. #truestory
That totally happened, guys. #truestory

GameMaven (crunchzilla.com): I stepped through it a bit. Interesting. I’ve been wanting to get into canvas a bit more. I need a programming project.

I also need a writing project.

I also need a project that will make me some money.

Lot of time thinking, no time so far committing.

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